Help! My Bike Is Making A Noise | How To Fix A Noisy Bike

Published on January 7th 2019

Share:

If your bike is making noise other than say the sound of rubber tyres swishing along, or maybe your gears changing, then it’s likely there is something that needs your attention. In this video, Jon shows you how to fix your noisy bike. Subscribe: http://gcntech.co/subscribetogcntech The GCN Shop: https://gcntech.co/9R GCN Tech Uploader: http://gcntech.co/upload Scraping or Grinding sounds The sound of your chain making noise could very likely be due to the indexing of your gears being not quite right. What I mean by this is that the chain is not correctly engaging with the sprocket that the derailleur is asking it to. The easiest way of checking this out is to shift gear into the sprocket at the rear with the least number of teeth. Now it’s there, have a look from behind the bike and check that the guide pulley, so the upper one, is directly beneath that sprocket. Now, unclamp that cable and wind in the barrel adjuster if you have one, and then pull the cable through the clamping bolt again, so it has a decent amount of tension, then clamp the cable. Now whilst turning the pedals give the gear lever a click into an easier gear so that the rear derailleur moves inwards towards the centre of the bike. Clicking A clicking sound when pedalling is probably one of the most irritating things you can have. But, what could it be exactly? Firstly, perhaps it’s the bottom bracket, so this is the junction box if you like for where the chainset sits in the frame of the bike. Bottom brackets that are press fit models, so ones that don't have teeth for a tool to engage with during installation, occasionally get a bit of a bad reputation for these noises as they are interference fit and can sometimes move around slightly, rather than thread fit models that are firmly in place. Rattling Final one. The rattle. This can be a fairly easy one as the “rattle” noise tends to be the loudest so the easiest to find and importantly lose. A big culprit here can be outer cables, bouncing onto the frame or sometimes, inside of a frame. Have a look at any cables and check for paint wear underneath, that could be the cause of the rattling. And a good idea here would actually be to put a piece of self-adhesive frame protector where the cable touches the frame as both a possible solution to the rattle as well as saving your paintwork. If you enjoyed this video, make sure to give it a thumbs up and share it with your friends. 👍 If you'd like to contribute captions and video info in your language, here's the link - https://gcntech.co/9Q Watch more on GCN Tech... Chris Opie's Orbea Orca Aero 📹 https://gcntech.co/opiebike Music: Epidemic Sound Table For Two (Instrumental Version) - Snake City Photos: © Velo Collection (TDW) / Getty Images & © Bettiniphoto / http://www.bettiniphoto.net/ Brought to you by the world’s biggest cycling channel, the Global Cycling Network (GCN), GCN Tech goes deeper into the bikes, kit and technology stories that matter. GCN Tech is utterly obsessed with seeking out and showcasing the best in bikes, tech, products and upgrades. Everywhere. Every week. From news and rumours, first ride exclusives, how-tos, the weekly GCN Tech Show, pro bikes, set-up tips and more, we geek out over the tiny details that can make the big differences to you. With years of racing and industry expertise, we also bring you instructive maintenance videos to hone your mechanical skills, as well as behind the scenes factory tours and in-depth analysis of kit chosen by the pro peloton to keep your finger on the pulse of cycling’s latest technological innovations. Engage with us every week on the channel and across social media – we’re here to answer every question you’ve got on cycling tech. Suscribirse a GCN en Español: http://gcn.eu/Suscribirse Facebook - http://gcntech.co/gcntechfb Instagram - http://gcntech.co/gcntechinsta Twitter - http://gcntech.co/gcntechtwee