Hot tech spotted: New 3D-printed saddle from Specialized

The new saddle looks to be in the shape of the existing Phenom and is being raced by multiple teams at Gent-Wevelgem

Clock14:30, Sunday 24th March 2024
The saddle looks to have the silhouette of Specialized's existing Phenom

© GCN

The saddle looks to have the silhouette of Specialized's existing Phenom

Ahead of Gent-Wevelgem, the Specialized-sponsored teams of Bora-Hansgrohe and Soudal Quick-Step were spotted with what looks to be a new saddle from the brand.

Specifics are thin on the ground at this point but the saddles in use look to be a new 3D-printed version of the Phenom saddle. This is certainly not Specialized’s first foray into the world of 3D-printing saddles with that brand launching its ‘Mirror’ technology on the S-Works Power and Romin saddles all the way back in 2020.

The new saddle looks to join the Romin and Power and sit somewhere in between the two in regards to its profile. Although similar in appearance to the Power saddle it is noticeably longer and features a flatter profile to the rear. Riders such as Kasper Asgreen are known for using the Phenom so the update to include the brand's 3D-printed technology would make sense.

Specialized’s Mirror technology uses a 3D-printed construction method to tailor the density of the saddle across the different areas. This allows the saddle to better support the rider without causing hotspots and discomfort.

The brand claims that “Unlike traditional single-density foam, Mirror technology allows for infinite density tuning with a single material. Using Body Geometry methodology and Retül data, the 3D printed matrix is tuned to support the sit bones across a greater area, creating a hammock effect that lets the saddle support your weight, not the tissue around your sit bones.”

3D-printed saddles are not something exclusive to the big S with Fizik and Selle Italia both also offering 3D-printed versions of their top-tier saddles. Currently, the technology is still a costly investment with both the 3D-printed versions of the S-Works Power and Romin costing £350.

With the saddle being spotted in use at Gent-Wevelgem it is fair to say that we can expect more details on this saddle in the near future.

Do you use a 3D printed saddle or do you see it as a worthwhile investment? Let us know in the comments below and for even more hot tech make sure to head over to the tech news section of the GCN website.

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